LUMINARY STUDIES

asylum-art:

asylum-art:

The Surreal Landscapes and Labyrinths of Raffaello Ossola

Artist onTumblr

vibrant dramatism and invented landscapes create an exciting space for the viewer to explore and ponder. Each one offers an opportunity to imagine yourself in his universe, wandering through mazes or floating around trees. Although Ossola takes liberties with his compositions, ultimately they retain the verticality/gravity that we are familiar with. Where he leaves the laws of our world more readily are in his pools. They seem to be reflecting a cloud, moon, or other objects in the sky, but the eye reads it more as if the elements mentioned are situated in an environment within the water. The surface of the water appears more like a penetrable glass casing than a body unto itself. It’s mesmerizing to see.

(via bryehn)

"We mostly hear stories from big personalities who already have a spotlight on them. I think that everybody carries stories that are just as profound as the ones we hear from celebrities or whoever. I’m interested in the stories of people who don’t usually get to tell them. I think those are sometimes the most interesting."

Wonderful Longform podcast conversation with artist and graphic journalist Wendy MacNaughton about her latest project, an illustrated catalog of the moving stories behind people’s tattoos.

MacNaughton’s Meanwhile project embodies this ethos brilliantly.

(via explore-blog)

floresenelatico:

Faces: an identity lost side project, Ashkan Honarvar, 2009

austinkleon:

Maps by Oliver Jeffers

I made a bunch of maps for the United Airlines inflight magazine. They are all geographically accurate.

Oliver has a new book coming in October, btw.

Filed under: maps, Oliver Jeffers

elementalsight:

fer1972:

Surreal Artworks by Akexander Rommel

This is the sort of art I’d love to one day have on my walls.

(via bryehn)

"The author of genius does keep till his last breath the spontaneity, the ready sensitiveness, of a child, the “innocence of eye” that means so much to the painter, the ability to respond freshly and quickly to new scenes, and to old scenes as though they were new… This freshness of response is vital to the author’s talent… But there is another element to his character, fully as important to his success. It is adult, discriminating, temperate, and just. It is the side of the artisan, the workman, and the critic rather than the artist. It must work continually with and through the emotional and childlike side, or we have no work of art. If either element of the artist’s character gets too far out of hand the result will be bad work, or no work at all. The writer’s first task is to get these two elements of his nature into balance, to combine their aspects into one integrated character."
Dorothea Brande, Becoming A Writer, 1934 (via austinkleon)
explore-blog:

Sam Harris on the paradox of meditation and how we can break through the clouds of our everyday illusions to reach self-transcendence
blackbirdspots:

Tom Phillips

blackbirdspots:

Tom Phillips

Fluttering wings leave lacy trails as moths beat their way to a floodlight on a rural Ontario lawn. The midsummer night’s exposure, held for 20 seconds, captured some of the hundreds of insects engaged in a nocturnal swarm.
PHOTO: STEVE IRVINE
(via national geographic)

Fluttering wings leave lacy trails as moths beat their way to a floodlight on a rural Ontario lawn. The midsummer night’s exposure, held for 20 seconds, captured some of the hundreds of insects engaged in a nocturnal swarm.

PHOTO: STEVE IRVINE

(via national geographic)

pikeys:

Slevin Aaron - Secret Garden (2013)

(via blackbirdspots)